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2016 Election Results
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Vice President - Elect
              David Kirsch, MD, PhD
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VISION STATEMENT:

This spring I had the privilege of participating in J. Martin Brown’s retirement symposium. It was an incredible opportunity to meet and listen to many of the giants in our field. They not only made major advances in the radiation sciences over the last several decades, but also helped to sustain a critical mass of scientists that maintained the vitality of the Radiation Research Society (RRS). The future of our Society depends not only on our current members’ continued innovation and discovery in the radiation sciences, but also on our ability to build a community of scientists with expertise in radiation chemistry, physics and biology. We should foster interaction between these basic scientists, physician scientists and clinicians in radiation oncology and create a venue where they can share perspectives, debate ideas, and collaborate to advance radiation research together. At this time of rapid advances in scientific technology, which has enabled the application of genome editing and sophisticated animal models to radiation research, I have no doubt that the future for innovation and discovery in the radiation sciences is bright. However, I believe that there is a crisis of identity for some investigators, whose research or training is radiation-related, but who may not currently feel that they belong in the RRS. For example, a scientist who studies the interaction of radiation therapy with the immune system may primarily identify as an immunologist rather than a radiation biologist. Similarly, an investigator who studies normal tissue injury from radiation may primarily identify as a stem cell biologist. To begin to address this challenge, as a member of Council I have worked with Claudia Wiese to help establish the Early Career Investigator (ECI) interest group within RRS. If elected Vice President-Elect, I will continue to work to encourage the participation of Early Career Investigators in the annual meeting through opportunities for travel support and invited presentations. I will also continue working to increase participation in RRS by a vibrant group of radiation oncology residents and junior independent physician scientists. These investigators are poised to make discoveries that will advance radiobiology and radiation medicine, but many are not currently connected to our Society. By focusing on Early Career Investigators who are already RRS members, as well as by increasing the participation of junior physician scientists in RRS, I believe that we can retain a critical mass of investigators as many of our Society’s most productive and influential members enter retirement. In addition, we need to reach out and encourage those investigators whose research includes a major component of radiation science, but who do not currently identify with RRS, to participate in our Society and in our annual meeting. By providing an annual meeting that combines stimulating science with the opportunity for radiation chemists, physicists, biologists, and oncologists to have interdisciplinary interactions, we will not only strengthen RRS, but also increase the cross-fertilization of ideas that will best advance radiation research. I have confidence that through these collaborations, we can make the most important scientific advances that will ultimately benefit society as we improve the use of radiotherapy to benefit cancer patients and limit radiation injury.

  Secretary/Treasurer-Elect

Edouard Azzam, PhD
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VISION STATEMENT:
The assets of our Society need to be maintained and enriched to effectively serve the programs of the Society and promote the training of new generation of radiation scientists. A strong and vibrant Radiation Research Society is a treasure to the various branches of the basic sciences and medicine. It is an asset that will continue to advise on policies that protect society and the environment.
  Councilor-at-Large

Chuan-Yuan Li, DSc
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VISION STATEMENT
My association with the Society started in 1989 when I participated my first RRS meeting in New Orleans as a graduate student. RRS has been my home society since then. I firmly believe that the future of a successful and vibrant Radiation Research Society depends on its scientific excellence and active participation from talented young scientists. If elected as a Councilorat-large, I will do my best to create opportunities for young scientists for them to participate and thrive within our Society. I will work with RRS scientists from different disciplines to achieve that goal.
  Councilor-at-Large

Michael Dingfelder, PhD
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VISION STATEMENT:
Radiation Research is a multi- and cross-disciplinary endeavor and relies on interactions between its basic disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine. None of the areas alone can adequately address and describe a coherent picture of radiation effects, but together their integrated combinations are powerful. This is what makes the Radiation Research Society strong and interesting to researchers. As councilor-at-large, if elected, I intend to work with everyone from all disciplines to keep up the Radiation Research Society’s reputation as a leader in the field and to contribute to society. One of the current challenges to a lot of larger scientific societies is declining membership with the creation of small and specialized interest groups and the lack of interest and new blood. We need to be creative and open the society to these specialized groups without disregarding our basic disciplines for the better of all. This will ensure that the Radiation Research Society stays the premiere location for advancements of radiation sciences. I would be proud to bring back my enthusiasm, expertise and experience to the Council. In particular, I intend to •represent all groups on the Council to achieve a synergetic effect; •work towards increasing membership, especially but not limited to young investigators from the U.S. and abroad (e.g., Europe, Pacific Rim); •attract new interest groups, especially from physics, chemistry, and (mathematical) modeling to collaborate and participate; and •help to create interesting and cross-disciplinary annual meetings.
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